How to lower red cell count when you have Hep B/C?

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  • I don’t know which it is. If it’s hepatitis B or C that if you have it you are unable to donate blood to the Red Cross. Apparently you are on a list and even if you get past that list it’s pretty unethical.

    Any tips? Like walk into a random urgent care and ask them to suck out a pint?

    My friend has an elevated count and what’s to know the safest way to take some blood out of his system.

  • They sell self administrating kits. You can just do it yourself. Look around on the medical websites.

  • If you get a kit to do it yourself make sure you have a friend with you in case you pass out. I’m sure a lot of guys on here can do it themselves and alone but for your first few times have a friend in the room.

    You could always hop on tinder and super like the nurses and explain your situation. You don’t have to mention steroids or hIV/hep B. You can just tell them you recently visited a third world county and can’t donate but need to because you’re redblood cell count is high from a bad diet/living in high altitude

  • Iirc, I’ve read that donating a pint of blood will only lower your crit 1-3% for a very short period of time. Within days your body will regenerate those rbcs. What your buddy probably wants to do is increase his plasma volume, thereby decreasing crit. This is theorized to occur when vigorous aerobic activity is performed over time. Do your own research though and see what you come up with

    Also of critical importance is hydration, especially if you’re on gear. I work in the medical field and can test my crit pretty much every day. When I’m on tren, my crit can easily be 54% or higher first thing in the morning. By 5 or 6pm,after a gallon of water, it can be 48% or lower. So make sure your buddy is truly drinking plenty of water.

  • As mdwilson said, single donation has a very quick rebound. I found that out recently from personal experience. About 6-8 donations a month is what you would need to really keep that rebound from happening. Doing that in a bathtub with a friend spotting you would be reckless as it gets. There is so much else that would require monitoring with pre and post bloodwork you just couldn’t set up. These aren’t bloods you could wait a few days for, these results would be needed right before every treatment.

    Anyways i found narngin at 500-1000 mgs a day is great for regulating crit. Its really a very easy and effective method.

  • inositol hexaphosphat IP6. iron chelators can be very useful as AAS causes iron retention which is part of the cause of high RBC

  • [quote=“Akula” pid=‘55196’ dateline=‘1559266881’]
    As mdwilson said, single donation has a very quick rebound. I found that out recently from personal experience. About 6-8 donations a month is what you would need to really keep that rebound from happening. Doing that in a bathtub with a friend spotting you would be reckless as it gets. There is so much else that would require monitoring with pre and post bloodwork you just couldn’t set up. These aren’t bloods you could wait a few days for, these results would be needed right before every treatment.

    Anyways i found narngin at 500-1000 mgs a day is great for regulating crit. Its really a very easy and effective method.
    [/quote]

    I started taking a product with Naringin in it as well. It’s called
    Double Wood’s Citrus Bergamot. It has a bunch of flavonoids not only naringin.

  • [quote=“alphaproject” pid=‘55201’ dateline=‘1559269364’]
    [quote=“Akula” pid=‘55196’ dateline=‘1559266881’]
    As mdwilson said, single donation has a very quick rebound. I found that out recently from personal experience. About 6-8 donations a month is what you would need to really keep that rebound from happening. Doing that in a bathtub with a friend spotting you would be reckless as it gets. There is so much else that would require monitoring with pre and post bloodwork you just couldn’t set up. These aren’t bloods you could wait a few days for, these results would be needed right before every treatment.

    Anyways i found narngin at 500-1000 mgs a day is great for regulating crit. Its really a very easy and effective method.
    [/quote]

    I started taking a product with Naringin in it as well. It’s called
    Double Wood’s Citrus Bergamot. It has a bunch of flavonoids not only naringin.
    [/quote]

    Nice thanks for the tip. Ill have to check that out. I use Bulk Supplements and it taste like nasty dirty ass.

  • [/quote]

    Nice thanks for the tip. Ill have to check that out. I use Bulk Supplements and it taste like nasty dirty ass.
    [/quote]

    I saw that exact supp but I didn’t want to mix it into anything because everyone says it’s TERRIBLE tasting.

  • [quote=“mdwilson2011” pid=‘55170’ dateline=‘1559245394’]
    Iirc, I’ve read that donating a pint of blood will only lower your crit 1-3% for a very short period of time. Within days your body will regenerate those rbcs. What your buddy probably wants to do is increase his plasma volume, thereby decreasing crit. This is theorized to occur when vigorous aerobic activity is performed over time. Do your own research though and see what you come up with

    Also of critical importance is hydration, especially if you’re on gear. I work in the medical field and can test my crit pretty much every day. When I’m on tren, my crit can easily be 54% or higher first thing in the morning. By 5 or 6pm,after a gallon of water, it can be 48% or lower. So make sure your buddy is truly drinking plenty of water.
    [/quote]

    [quote=“Akula” pid=‘55196’ dateline=‘1559266881’]
    As mdwilson said, single donation has a very quick rebound. I found that out recently from personal experience. About 6-8 donations a month is what you would need to really keep that rebound from happening. Doing that in a bathtub with a friend spotting you would be reckless as it gets. There is so much else that would require monitoring with pre and post bloodwork you just couldn’t set up. These aren’t bloods you could wait a few days for, these results would be needed right before every treatment.

    Anyways i found narngin at 500-1000 mgs a day is great for regulating crit. Its really a very easy and effective method.
    [/quote]

    It seems that the OPs friend doesn’t have an issue with HCT, but RBC instead. Fortunately, the rebound you’re referring to isn’t much of a concern when speaking about red blood cells.

  • @“FixerUpper” you’re right. Typically people ask about hct, so I assumed too much

    Is dumping blood effective at reducing rbc count? I would think if your rbc count is elevated and you’re on gear, then dumping 500ml of blood isn’t gonna do much long term.

  • [quote=“FixerUpper” pid=‘55224’ dateline=‘1559303804’]
    [quote=“mdwilson2011” pid=‘55170’ dateline=‘1559245394’]
    Iirc, I’ve read that donating a pint of blood will only lower your crit 1-3% for a very short period of time. Within days your body will regenerate those rbcs. What your buddy probably wants to do is increase his plasma volume, thereby decreasing crit. This is theorized to occur when vigorous aerobic activity is performed over time. Do your own research though and see what you come up with

    Also of critical importance is hydration, especially if you’re on gear. I work in the medical field and can test my crit pretty much every day. When I’m on tren, my crit can easily be 54% or higher first thing in the morning. By 5 or 6pm,after a gallon of water, it can be 48% or lower. So make sure your buddy is truly drinking plenty of water.
    [/quote]

    [quote=“Akula” pid=‘55196’ dateline=‘1559266881’]
    As mdwilson said, single donation has a very quick rebound. I found that out recently from personal experience. About 6-8 donations a month is what you would need to really keep that rebound from happening. Doing that in a bathtub with a friend spotting you would be reckless as it gets. There is so much else that would require monitoring with pre and post bloodwork you just couldn’t set up. These aren’t bloods you could wait a few days for, these results would be needed right before every treatment.

    Anyways i found narngin at 500-1000 mgs a day is great for regulating crit. Its really a very easy and effective method.
    [/quote]

    It seems that the OPs friend doesn’t have an issue with HCT, but RBC instead. Fortunately, the rebound you’re referring to isn’t much of a concern when speaking about red blood cells.
    [/quote]

    Hemocrit is the percentage of rbcs by volume in total blood volume. So how do they not have a relationship?

  • Not sure if it’s the best option, but it’s the only option I have. I have been self-phlebotomizing for years but have to stay on an good iron supplement year round. It does keep hematocrit down enough. Not my favorite thing to do, but Red Cross always finds some reason to not take my blood (BP, for example), and that’s after I managed to get myself off their dumb blacklist because I told them I was on doctor-prescribed TRT at the time (which was true). Also, physicians I’ve gone through for TRT have just been dumb as damn rocks, and when hematocrit starts climbing, they don’t know what to do and want to stop TRT. I gave up and do it all on my own now. Early on, I did try Naringin, which didn’t do anything for me unfortunately.

  • [quote=“mdwilson2011” pid=‘55233’ dateline=‘1559309483’]
    @“FixerUpper” you’re right. Typically people ask about hct, so I assumed too much

    Is dumping blood effective at reducing rbc count? I would think if your rbc count is elevated and you’re on gear, then dumping 500ml of blood isn’t gonna do much long term.
    [/quote]

    Yes, removing blood is absolutely effective at lowering red blood cell count. It’s not a permanent solution though. A “one time” fix doesn’t really exist for this, as your body is always working to create new/healthy red blood cells. It takes about a week for a red blood cell to be produced, and the lifespan of a red blood cell is roughly 120 days.

    The long term solution for somebody who needs to keep their RBC count down is regular (or somewhat regular) phlebotomy. After blood is removed, your bone marrow continues to produce RBCs as it normally would, but this process takes time, and there are many factors that affect the rate and quantity at which they are replenished (tissue oxygenation, erythropoietin production, vitamin intake/food consumption, etc).

    Most healthy people won’t have a need to remove RBCs via donation/phlebotomy on an extremely regular basis. Most of us get by just fine by donating here and there, perhaps once or twice yearly, or even less in some cases.

    It’s also important to note that it’s entirely possible to OVER donate. Donating blood is good for you in moderation, but doing it too frequently can actually be quite detrimental to your health. This is because blood donation lowers your ferritin stores. Ferritin represents the amount of iron that is stored (not circulating) in your body. It’s mostly found in skeletal muscle, bone marrow, spleen, and the liver.

    Those who donate too frequently will deplete these ferritin/iron stores, which can cause a host of symptoms/health concerns. Those who donate every couple of months just for the hell of it are almost universally leaving themselves with inadequate ferritin stores, so just be a little cautious about your donation frequency.
    [hr]
    [quote=“Akula” pid=‘55516’ dateline=‘1559443494’]
    [quote=“FixerUpper” pid=‘55224’ dateline=‘1559303804’]
    [quote=“mdwilson2011” pid=‘55170’ dateline=‘1559245394’]
    Iirc, I’ve read that donating a pint of blood will only lower your crit 1-3% for a very short period of time. Within days your body will regenerate those rbcs. What your buddy probably wants to do is increase his plasma volume, thereby decreasing crit. This is theorized to occur when vigorous aerobic activity is performed over time. Do your own research though and see what you come up with

    Also of critical importance is hydration, especially if you’re on gear. I work in the medical field and can test my crit pretty much every day. When I’m on tren, my crit can easily be 54% or higher first thing in the morning. By 5 or 6pm,after a gallon of water, it can be 48% or lower. So make sure your buddy is truly drinking plenty of water.
    [/quote]

    [quote=“Akula” pid=‘55196’ dateline=‘1559266881’]
    As mdwilson said, single donation has a very quick rebound. I found that out recently from personal experience. About 6-8 donations a month is what you would need to really keep that rebound from happening. Doing that in a bathtub with a friend spotting you would be reckless as it gets. There is so much else that would require monitoring with pre and post bloodwork you just couldn’t set up. These aren’t bloods you could wait a few days for, these results would be needed right before every treatment.

    Anyways i found narngin at 500-1000 mgs a day is great for regulating crit. Its really a very easy and effective method.
    [/quote]

    It seems that the OPs friend doesn’t have an issue with HCT, but RBC instead. Fortunately, the rebound you’re referring to isn’t much of a concern when speaking about red blood cells.
    [/quote]

    Hemocrit is the percentage of rbcs by volume in total blood volume. So how do they not have a relationship?

    [/quote]

    Hematocrit percentage and red blood cell count are very closely related. Not sure what I said to make you think that I believe otherwise.

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