How intense is competing really?

Topic created · 13 Posts · 541 Views
  • I see people talking about how contest prep is unbearable and you feel like death at the end, etc., but then how do these people have jobs? Is it slightly exaggerated or do they take time off, or what? Reason I’m asking is because I want to know if I should bother having any aspirations of ever competing with my current career path, I’m in medical school right now and the way people make contest prep out to be (never done it/been in contest condition myself obviously), I feel like I would be setting myself up to make a bad mistake and get sued by a patient, = life over, later on if I tried it. I definitely want to but it doesn’t seem possible unless it’s exaggerated a lot like with most fitness related things.

  • On-stage competition is only shitty if you’re super serious about it OR if you’ve been shitty on your diet and work ethic then try to last minute throw a bandaid fix on that shit. Some guys have no problems competing and placing well because they just walk around in stage shape 24/7, while others have an off-season and then come out of that phase to spend 12 weeks hating themselves while they track every macro and micronutrient, take specifically timed doses of this or that compound or supplement, do mindless fucking cardio, actually get 8+ hours of sleep a night, cook up enough food every few days to feed a whole family just for themselves (btw reheated boring meat + rice from three days ago tastes like shit no matter what anyone tries to say) and still work a full shift at their jobs which sadly for a lot of guys to afford their lifestyle they’re pulling a lot of overtime at work so 10-12 hour days for most until they get sponsors and ad revenue and shit.

    Meanwhile in happy land, powerlifting and strongman don’t require near as much self loathing and you can be a moderately cut (or not; fat guys can lift shit too!) individual with a shit-ass diet and a mountain of retard strength and just waltz into comp days chugging Monster and eating Honey Buns and still do great.

  • [quote=“riskyneedlefetish” pid=‘75315’ dateline=‘1574387042’]
    I see people talking about how contest prep is unbearable and you feel like death at the end, etc., but then how do these people have jobs? Is it slightly exaggerated or do they take time off, or what? Reason I’m asking is because I want to know if I should bother having any aspirations of ever competing with my current career path, I’m in medical school right now and the way people make contest prep out to be (never done it/been in contest condition myself obviously), I feel like I would be setting myself up to make a bad mistake and get sued by a patient, = life over, later on if I tried it. I definitely want to but it doesn’t seem possible unless it’s exaggerated a lot like with most fitness related things.
    [/quote]

    It’s based more on the individual I’ve seen people who are stage ready but still have a good attitude and I’ve seen people who absolutely hate it. The only way you’re going to know is to try it out for yourself and just keep focused and have some self awareness about your mood you’ll be fine.

  • Your in med school on your way towards a serious achievement… Prancing around on stage half naked or 90% naked with other guys all oiled up, just to get a plastic trophy, is not a serious achievement. In fact it’s mildly embarrassing, especially because 95% of people don’t give a flying shit about bodybuilding competitions or fitness shows.

    This is just my own opinion of course, but you should do what makes ya happy.

  • I agree with masteron. Focus on your studies and get your education out of the way.

    To me standing up on stage in a g-string flexing is kind of embarrassing. There’s nothing wrong with being a big guy for the sake of building strength and having motivation, but to me the whole posing on stage just seemed silly. That’s why I never commented to that thread asking about our favorite body builders, because I don’t have any. It’s like going to a 4-h event and judging animals for the best breeding stock. I do think Mike Mentzer was an interesting bodybuilder, only because the guy seemed to have a whole lot more going on upstairs than the typical empty headed bodybuilder.

    Do enjoy watching fat slob powerlifters, only because I can’t imagine being able to lift like that without getting injured.

  • You can easily walk around 8-10% year round with a good diet and 1 cheat meal a week and still feel amazing. Especially if you stay 10% for a few months it becomes the norm. Don’t compete but be a 200+ shredded cunt year round and your life will be amazing especially as a med student

  • Yeah of course career and stuff is #1 priority. I see bodybuilding/steroids as something that exists to make my life better, not what gives my life meaning and being obsessed with it. I am interested in competing in the sense of just doing it for “fun”/the experience and as an extension of the hobby, not really taking it seriously obsessive to a mentally unhealthy point.

    Thanks all

  • And yet body building, acquiring drugs and making sure your supply is secure is a bit of an obsession.

  • [quote=“Dexter” pid=‘75495’ dateline=‘1574554683’]
    And yet body building, acquiring drugs and making sure your supply is secure is a bit of an obsession.
    [/quote]

    ok

  • this is a good thread! I don’t have much to contribute as I don’t compete but my trainer does and we are friends, it is weird/exciting to watch him prep. At the end of the day, I sort of agree with @“Masterofron” (never thought I would say that) but putting on a bikini or swimsuit and posing on stage is kinda queer (not homosexual per say but fuckin weird!)

    I like bodybuilding because it ISN’T competitive, it’s me Vs me. A personal journey. Skateboarding and Rock Climbing was the same way, but we figure out how to make them into contests, but I think just PHYSIQUE competition (not strength) is bizarre form of male beauty pageants. No offense to everyone, just my 2¢

  • [quote=“unclecurley” pid=‘75516’ dateline=‘1574563510’]
    but I think just PHYSIQUE competition (not strength) is bizarre form of male beauty pageants. No offense to everyone, just my 2¢
    [/quote]

    To me as a dude looking at another dude is just not appealing at all. It’s a thin line for a hetero guy to enjoy looking at oiled up men in bikinis.

    And there’s the genetic aspect to it as well, if you don’t have really strong joints and connective tissue the chance of you holding up long term is slim, so then you’re stuck with a chronic injury because you had to push it to the limits. Competing forces you to often go past your limits…Ronnie Coleman is a good example.

    I say enjoy the pump, get as big and strong as you can without injury and go on with your day doing something a little more interesting.

  • [quote=“unclecurley” pid=‘75516’ dateline=‘1574563510’]
    this is a good thread! I don’t have much to contribute as I don’t compete but my trainer does and we are friends, it is weird/exciting to watch him prep. At the end of the day, I sort of agree with @“Masterofron” (never thought I would say that) but putting on a bikini or swimsuit and posing on stage is kinda queer (not homosexual per say but fuckin weird!)

    I like bodybuilding because it ISN’T competitive, it’s me Vs me. A personal journey. Skateboarding and Rock Climbing was the same way, but we figure out how to make them into contests, but I think just PHYSIQUE competition (not strength) is bizarre form of male beauty pageants. No offense to everyone, just my 2¢
    [/quote]

    Goddamnit I’m not that bad… Am I…? 😞

    Anyways since you touched base on the whole “competitive” aspect of bodybuilding, you reminded me of one of the things that makes bodybuilding competitions/competing fucking RETARDED.

    Calling it a sport! So many people say bodybuilding is a damn sport, it’s absolutely absurd. Using mass quantities of steroids and PEDS, forcing your body to go through extreme weight fluctuations and diets (starving and get fat over and over again), and picking up heavy shit then putting it down at a gym just to prance around 95% naked on stage while oiled up next to other men is NOT a goddamn sport. In fact, based off my short summary of what bodybuilding actually is, most people would refer to it as a form of mental disability.

  • I have very little interest in the professional aspect of bodybuilding shows, I also see them just as a beauty pageant. Think about it, you are in almost critical condition on stage, at your weakest you will ever be. Some drop over from just walking and posing on the stage, because of the retarded diuretic abuse, and cramp up into a ball. Performance is the last thing on those guys minds on the stage. Most usually just think about the binge-fest they will embark on afterwards ;-).

    Compare this to any other competition. I just do some amateur grappling, and even we amateurs do our damn hardest to be at our best physical condition, to be at our strongest point in the year. Of course there is also weight cutting, but performance always is important in real sports. Or Powerlifting, Weightlifting, MMA, Boxing, Gymnastics, Track n Field, you name it. Hell, even damn Horse Riding is 5000 times more of a sport than those beauty pageants.

    But this doesn’t mean that it is easy or simple to get in good stage condition on the right time. The prep is gruelling, the 20-16 weeks diet with excessive cardio and a lot of high volume lifting with enormous amounts of PEDs and other Drugs are mentally challenging as fuck. Pure misery - for a cheap plastic trophy 😉

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